The Problem With the Marissa Alexander–George Zimmerman Comparison

The Alexander case, currently drawing protest, is a travesty not of "stand your ground" but of sentencing

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Bob Self / The Florida Times / REUTERS

Marissa Alexander in a Duval County courtroom in Jacksonville, Fla., on May 3, 2012

Critics of the George Zimmerman verdict argue that the Florida criminal-justice system is discriminatory — and that a black defendant would not have been acquitted for doing what Zimmerman did. Now they are rallying on behalf of a case that they say proves their point. Marissa Alexander fired a single shot at her abusive husband and missed. She later invoked the “stand your ground” doctrine. Verdict: guilty, with a 20-year prison sentence.

Alexander’s supporters have been protesting across Florida in recent days, demanding that she be pardoned. Alexander’s self-defense claim, like Zimmerman’s — and most others — is messy, with facts that can be interpreted in a variety of ways. What is clear, however, is that the 20-year sentence and the Florida law that mandated it are a travesty of justice.

(MORE: Trayvon Martin and Making Whiteness Visible)

Alexander, a mother of three, was convicted in March 2012 of three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. In August 2010, she got into a dispute with her husband Rico Gray in their Jacksonville kitchen. Alexander ended up getting a handgun out of the garage and firing one shot in the direction of Gray and his two sons, missing everyone.

Alexander’s supporters emphasize that Gray had a long history of spousal abuse and that she had recently obtained an order of protection against him. And they point to a particularly appalling sound bite from Gray: “I got five baby mamas, and I put my hand on every last one of them except one.” They say she was in reasonable fear that she would be killed or injured and fired a warning shot to protect herself — well within what the “stand your ground” law allows.

Prosecutors see it differently. They insist that Alexander did not stand her ground: rather, she left the scene, got a handgun and then returned. They say Gray made a call to 911 that indicated that he thought his life was in danger and had been trying to flee. (There have been reports that Alexander was physically abusive toward Gray.) Alexander’s prosecutors had an advantage over Zimmerman’s. Trayvon Martin was not alive to contradict Zimmerman’s self-defense claim. But the three people Alexander shot at were around to testify against her.

(MORE: Where Was ‘Stand Your Ground’ for Marissa Alexander?)

It is frustrating to admit, but Alexander’s self-defense claim is a close call, and ultimately a very fact-specific one. If she really was trapped and reasonably feared that she was in danger of death or serious injury, she had the right to shoot in self-defense. But if Alexander had a clear path of escape, she should have fled before putting not just Gray but two innocent children at risk of being shot. The jury clearly did not see the facts her way. (It casts some doubt on their verdict, however, that they reached it after just 12 minutes of deliberation.)

There is something undeniably galling about seeing Alexander sent away for 20 years, while Zimmerman, who shot a 17-year-old to death, walks free. But it is not clear that the answer is to broadly protect people who shoot guns in domestic situations and then claim self-defense. The more expansively courts interpret “stand your ground” in circumstances like Alexander’s, the more bullets are likely to be ricocheting through family homes, and the more deaths there are likely to be.

What is clear is that Alexander’s 20-year prison sentence is horrific. There is a different Florida law that is responsible for the length of the sentence: the so-called 10-20-Life statute, which says that if someone is convicted of an aggravated assault in which they discharge a firearm, they must be sentenced to 20 years in prison, regardless of mitigating circumstances. When Circuit Judge James Daniel sentenced Alexander, he declared that once the state proved its case, “the decision on an appropriate sentence” was “entirely taken out of my hands.”

Alexander’s case is less about “stand your ground” than about the horrors of excessive, inflexible sentencing laws. Whatever crimes legislators were thinking of when they decided to establish the mandatory 20-year prison sentence in 10-20-Life, there is no way they included a battered woman feeling threatened and firing a single shot that missed her abusive spouse. Given the facts of her case, prosecutors were being overzealous in charging Alexander with a crime that is punishable by a 20-year sentence.

There have been growing calls for Florida to repeal its “stand your ground” law. But people who care about making Florida’s criminal-justice system fairer should work just as hard to repeal the cruelly inflexible 10-20-Life statute. More immediately, Alexander’s sentence should be commuted, because it fails the most basic test of just punishment: it does not fit the crime.

307 comments
SumthingSublime
SumthingSublime

Well I think something like this tells people... "Don't fire a warning shot. Just shoot them instead"... I could be wrong but would she have gotten 20 years for shooting and killing a man who she had a restraining order against and who beat her and a man who made her fear for her life? That would be classified as stand your ground right? Well I am sure the next person in this situation is just going to "shoot first and ask questions later".

folanguer
folanguer

"I got five baby mammas, and I put my hands on every last one of them except for one," Rico Gray confessed during a November 2010 deposition. "The way I was with women ... they had to walk on eggshells around me." He recalled punching women in the face, shoving them, choking them and tossing them out the door.  [....]  Yet somehow, after one of those women fired a warning shot into the ceiling of her Jacksonville, Fla., home to scare him away during yet another violent outburst, prosecutors managed to convince a jury that Gray was the victim. As a result, Marissa Alexander, a 31-year-old mother of three, faces 20 years in prison for standing her ground against an abusive husband."The gun was never pointed at me," Gray said. "She just didn't want me to put my hands on her anymore, so she did what she feel like she have to do to make sure she wouldn't get hurt." If his sons hadn't been in the house, Gray said, "I probably would have tried to take the gun from her," and, "I probably would have put my hand on her."

In Orinda, California, a woman died in my arms after her husband had stabbed her repeatedly and pushed her out of his SUV. Yes, there had been a restraining order but that did not stop the violence. Why do I mention it? Marissa Alexander and Elnora Caldwell were abused by their husbands - If Marissa had not fired those warning shots to protect herself and her children from an abusive man, she would have ended up like Elnora Caldwell. These two cases have nothing to do with color or race, but everything to do with domestic violence and abuse. Our laws must reflect the needs of our society: women are no longer inferior to men; women deserve respect as much as any men.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

The fact is that volumes of mitigating and exculpatory evidence were withheld from the jury.  Rico had tried to frame two different partners previously.  Not admissible.  Rico had beaten Marissa into the hospital previously.  Not admissible.  Rico had a long history of violence against women.  Not admissible.  Rico had a restraining order against him and if he had obeyed it none of this would have happened.  Not admissible.  Rico's testimony was purchased by the prosecution by not trying him for violating the restraining order Marissa had against him.  Not admissible.  All of the abuser turned accuser's prior baby mommas had lived in terror of his man.  Not admissible.  Marissa was an excellent shot and could have riddled him with bullets.  Not introduced.  Marissa most likely was suffering from post partum depression, traumatic brain injury, and or post traumatic stress disorder.  Not introduced.  No one can blame this jury.  All of the blame lies with the prosecutor, the judge and their hero the abuser turned accuser.

OnewitnessUS
OnewitnessUS

I live in Florida.  Recently I had a registered pedophile (a neighbor) on my property who threatened me and then legally battered me.  I ran into my house for safety.  (I'm a 53 year old disabled veteran).  He carried a hidden camera with him and captured the entire event.  He stood on my porch yelling to his girlfriend something about a gun so, in fear for my life I stepped out with my 12 gauge shotgun and he attacked me, trying to take the gun.  I verbally warned him to leave.  I was arrested for "aggravated assault with a deadly weapon" and spent a month in jail because I they put such a high bond on me.  I am facing 3 years mandatory prison sentence!  So don't talk to me about how "fair" the law is.  My case wasn't even a domestic case, I had a violent sex offender neighbor on my property with a hidden camera with my 12 year old in the house and all I did was produce my OWN gun on my OWN property and I am being prosecuted!  

rustytrawler
rustytrawler

Hmm. STAND YOUR GROUND means that you do not have to choose "aclear path of escape," no? And since Zimmerman was told not to follow and then did, he also had a clear path of escape.

So the comparisons does seem to hold up, as far as I can see.

NadjaAdolf
NadjaAdolf

Has anyone else noticed that white people did not riot after Christopher Cervini was shot and killed? Did anyone else notice that Roderick Scott was acquitted for killing Christopher Cervini, a slightly built teenage boy? Did anyone else notice that white people didn't scream racism when Roderick Scott, who happened to be black killed Christopher Cervini, who happened to be white? Anyone else notice that not only did no one run around shrieking "Justice for Christopher" and holding looting sessions as protests, the white community didn't even seem particularly upset that Mr. Cervini  discovered that being a thug can be fatal?

We have a serious cultural divide. White people can't wait to send a Ted Bundy or a Scott Peterson to death row for serious conduct unbecoming a human being; and white leaders prefer to keep their mouths shut rather than sympathize with thugs. Black leaders seem to sympathize with criminals and ignore the victims - while the recent riots were occurring in Oakland, an elementary school girl was murdered execution style - not one word from black leaders, not one protest march, not one witness would come forward.

If any black person wishes to know why Americans of white, Asian, Native, or Latino ancestry are uncomfortable around blacks, it is because it looks from the outside that black people are inclined to aid and abet felons after the act rather than stop the murder of their own, let alone people from outside the black community. They don't hate black people - they are afraid of them. When events such as "hoodie Sunday" are held in churches, other ethnic groups are left both confused and appalled - after all, the videotapes shown on the nightly news looking for help to find robbers, murderers, burglars, and rapists seem to always feature perpetrators wearing black hoodies - not matter the race, creed, or color of the perpetrator. Why would anyone encourage their children to dress like the guys seen robbing the 7-11 or the Safeway on the nightly news? When other groups here black people complain about having to teach their children how to dress and  behave in public, it is like receiving a message from the moon - all parents do that, and all parents advise their children that if they dress or behave in ways that look suspicious, they will have to deal with the ramifications of doing so. The easiest way to deal with a frightening, confusing situation is to avoid it.

NadjaAdolf
NadjaAdolf

Marissa Alexander should have been acquitted as it was not reasonable for prosecutors, the jury, or the judge to insist she should have abandoned her children to her abusive husband in order to save herself.

Many abusive partners have seriously harmed or even killed children in order to attack the children's mothers. We had a case here in northern California where a felon with an illegal weapon murdered his girlfriend's young daughter after his girlfriend leaped from a moving car when he tried to kill her. We had another prize winner in southern California who poured an inflammable liquid all over his son and set him afire to revenge himself on his ex-wife. (The boy survived, horribly disfigured and disabled, and his mother eventually married a detective who worked on the case and fell in love with her and her son.) Back in my old stomping grounds of the Pacific Northwest we had a sociopath who was the prime suspect in the murder of his wife who blew up his house with his poor children inside it and killed them.

Almost everyday one reads in the news about abusive spouses of both genders who harm children to get back at partners or former partners. To expect a parent to flee and leave their children in the hands of an abuser is unreasonable.

As a side note; black people are about 16.6% of the Florida population, yet make up 1/3 of those who invoke the stand your ground defense. Both Latinos and blacks are more likely to be successful with the "stand your ground" defense than whites.

JasonHouston1
JasonHouston1

@SumthingSublime  I think people are using the term "stand your ground" incorrectly. It's just a clause in their self defense statute that removes a duty to retreat when defending yourself. If it isn't considered self defense, then stand your ground does nothing. And they didn't consider it self defense because she was safe before she reentered the home with a gun. And killing a man who you have a restraining order against when he's in your home is much easier to defend than going into the home of a man who the court has ordered you to stay away from and firing a gun at him. But the media seems to be leaving that out, while it is easily verified by checking the court documents. As for the 20 years, I don't know if it's excessive or not... she fired a gun into a room containing two young children, which I believe put their lives in danger. That, and the prosecution had already offered her a shorter sentence including time served had she pleaded guilty, but she refused.

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@folanguer 

Marissa violated a court order of no contact to conspire with Rico to make that deposition, which he recanted days later when he found out she lied to him and was hooking up with her first husband. When Marissa found out he recanted the deposition she violated the court order again and assaulted him, gave him a black eye. When Rico reported this to police Marissa at first denied it, then made up some different lies, but the court bought zero of her baloney and revoked bail.

Marissa and Rico beat on each other for 4 years, and she married him during the forth year.

Sad that you are so easily fooled by her claims and the one sided reporting. Marissa had no reason to return to the kitchen or to discharge the weapon, she turned down a 3 year plea and now has a long time to reconsider her foolish actions.

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@JohnInIndyIn 

Marissa was suffering from, "I've got something for your as" syndrome and fired a gun in anger while threatening her husband. None of that other baloney matters.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@OnewitnessUS I wonder if your neighbor has the same lawyer/private prosecutor that Rico Gray had.  They probably plotted against you for a long time before actually trapping you.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@OnewitnessUS Was the tape introduced into evidence.  Was the rest of his video library subpoenaed to look for other instances where he ensnared people?  Did you have a public defender?  Their job is not to defend you but to collude with the prosecution to impress you into the service of Unicor.   

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@OnewitnessUS 

That is how it works, take your weapon to the problem, you go to jail. Once you were safely inside you home, going back outside armed was a big mistake.

Defend is ok.

Threaten is not.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@OnewitnessUS Had you called the police and told them who was on your property and you feared for your son and yourself it would have been him going to jail not you. bad judgement on your part.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@OnewitnessUS Sounds like you need a different prosecutor.  Angela Corey is an elected official and she relishes her duty which is to supply the prison industrial complex with a steady stream of slave labor. 

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@rustytrawler 

Duty to safe retreat if possible only applies to the moment you make a claimed act of self defense, not previous events.

No evidence supports Zimmerman going south of the T that Trayvon ran from towards Brandy Green's condo. Trayvon came back up to the T behind Zimmerman and beat him for looking gay.


Zimmerman's act of self defense occurs while he is being sat on and beaten, so no retreat.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@rustytrawler what a moron, when he was told not to follow was before Tm confronted him, so escape was not needed un till then not prior. 

politicalseason
politicalseason

@NadjaAdolf You're giving what you cite as the point of view of non white persons by referencing instances where you think blacks have reacted unreasonably to criminal cases and their legal system results. However, you are doing that as though these reactions occurred in a vacuum.  They do not.  This is the same country in which there are numerous cases of blacks wrongly accused, imprisoned and even executed in what are clear miscarriages of justice.  This is a country in which there are any number of  black deaths at the hands of police  which are not justified and where no accountability is applied without major demonstration by the public and often not even then.  Further, even in cases where the behavior of authorities is clearly egregious (Rodney King), the non black community will argue that the behavior was justified. That's the context. which I think you are ignoring. 

Blacks are quite often victims of crime and have a desire for law and order just as strong as any other ethnic group.  Blacks however have not only a history but continuing experience of a criminal justice system which does not provide fair administration of the law.  

Lastly, teaching your children how to behave in public is of course the norm, but if you're telling me that you think white parents are often advising their kids about how to minimize the possibility they might be killed by police for no reason or how to avoid being unjustly singled out as suspicious for behaving normally, I don't believe that to be the case.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@NadjaAdolf Well said.  Trayvon Martin was not Amadou Diallo.  The racism in this country that is really terrible is institutional.  We have 5% of the worlds population and 25% of the worlds prisoners.  Or should I say prison labor?

We have more prison labor than China.  If you find an American flag made in America, chances are it was made in prison. 

Openminded1
Openminded1

@NadjaAdolf Very well said Nadja, but the black community will never learn with the race card being used for every thing that does not go there way. Then when you have people like big mouth Al not so Sharp Sharpton and jessie I need more tv exposure Jackson talking and stirring up the black community. things will never change. And to make things worse Obama since he no longer needs the white vote opens his mouth to win favor with blacks who thought he was not black enough.

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@NadjaAdolf If you accept that the system is generally fair that might indicate some level of error in a culture where a 1/3 of the people end up in jail, and some members of that culture refuse to consider that as a possibility.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @folanguer The star witness changed his testimony with impunity and testified in exchange for immunity.  He got a black eye long after the incident.  She got beaten into the hospital and got her baby beaten out of her prematurely before the incident.  Post Partum depression can last for years.  The only thing that happened to Rico after beating her so badly was that he got a restraining order against him that he broke with impunity resulting in an altercation that put Marissa in prison for 20 years.  If it were up to MikadoCat she'd still be cowering in the garage.   She turned down a plea agreement that would have branded her a felon and given full custody of her baby because she made the huge mistake of trusting the criminal "justice" system in Florida.  She also didn't know that all exculpatory and mitigating evidence would be deemed inadmissible. 

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @JohnInIndyIn It probably would have mattered to the jury but this information was concealed from them so that they could reach "the right" verdict. 

If it was you or some one you loved on trial I think it would matter.  Rico will probably kill his next partner and then you can blame her corpse.

Loosely translated, "I've got something for your as" means:

You have a court ordered duty to get 500' away from me and not to be violent with me so you better leave. 

Instead he advanced toward her and threatened to kill her because he thought she didn't have the guts.   He was wrong about that but he still prevailed because he was an expert at working the system.  That's why he has a 6 page long history of violence against women but gets to walk around knocking and beating up more women while MRS Alexander makes American flags for 23 cents an hour for the next 20 years.

Wave yours proudly.  And sanctimoniously. 

Harmlessstalker
Harmlessstalker

@JohnInIndyIn @OnewitnessUS John you are either delusional or just a bad liar, I know lots of good lawyers who were great public defender attorneys at 1 time,and became private because of 1 reason, the salary is a freaking joke. I mean google Alan Chipperfield. Ann Finnell. Robert Link etc. I know for a fact they were great PD's who worked overtime + weekends trying to help their clients,3 of which happen to be relatives of mine,and when Robert got my sister a NOT guilty verdict on a (domestic)  2nd degree murder charge, he was happier than we were,he'd picked her up and spun around with her before she knew she was free to go home...

OnewitnessUS
OnewitnessUS

@MikadoCat @rustytrawler Florida law states that NO ONE has to "retreat" on their own property so the Judge in the Marissa Alexander case was just WRONG and most likely prejudice and so was the Jury for expecting that she should have retreated.  The law does NOT require retreat to safety on your OWN property.  It's the HEART of the stand your ground law.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@Openminded1 @rustytrawler Yes.  He was on his way back to his car when he was apparently set upon.  Sadly by a person who could well have thought his own life was in jeopardy.  It would have all been much better if GZ had just introduced himself and asked if he could have been of assistance.

"Hi. I'm George, I live here and I haven't met you yet.  What's your name?" Or if he had a sign on top of his car that said crime watch or something.  I believe that GZ's gun went off in a struggle.  I also believe that he had a right to stand his ground. 

I am even more certain that Marissa Alexander had a right to stand her ground in her own home against a man who had beaten her and her unborn baby into the hospital and who broke the law by coming within 500' of her.  If she had shot him dead she would be free but she is so merciful that she has never wished that even once.  She exhibited mercy and she deserves mercy. Not twenty years of forced prison labor. 

I on the other hand wish she had shot his eyes out at 499' and 1/2 inches.  Then I wouldn't have to worry so.  This injustice makes me sick and makes me feel compelled to fix it if I can.  There are other things I would be better off doing. 

Openminded1
Openminded1

@politicalseason @NadjaAdolf a man with the chip on his shoulders syndrome . Your thinking will keep you moving backwards for every foot you move forward. You sound intelligent, but you use the race card that will not work. blacks are falsely accused sometimes. the problem is the economics of the justice system. Whites real lawyer, blacks public defender paper pusher.

Harmlessstalker
Harmlessstalker

@JohnInIndyIn @NadjaAdolf I am a black woman! I didn't just grow up, I was RAISED. I was 7th in a family of 12 we were dirt poor, there were times when I had only 2 pair of underwear to my name,and had to wash out 1 pair on my hand while wearing the other, I'm talking at 10 and in 5th grade. at 14 I stole a 50 cent record, that I wanted very badly, I got caught caught and went in handcuffs to Juvie, my dad was deceased,my mom was hospitalized, and my big sister left me there for 2 days, when I did get home I got my behind torn,AND I had to go back to Woolworth's and apologize, I learned my lesson and never got in trouble again,I'm 51 now and I don't buy that crap about racism (yes it exist) keeping you from achieving your goals in life, that's B.S and an excuse for being lazy, my friend's grandfather is 96 years old, and was a doctor, imagine what he must have endured before getting that M D behind his name,but he didn't let anything stand in the way of his dreams...

Openminded1
Openminded1

@MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf Cat I do not think she was shooting at the kids, but with that said she was stupid and careless to fire in there direction just lucky she missed or is bad shot either way it could have been a bad situation .

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat @folanguer 

What part of Marissa went to Rico's house and violated the restraining order don't you understand?

If it were up to ME she would never have gone to Rico's house and avoided him for the rest of her life. Alexander was free to leave out the garage door which worked just fine, out the front door or the back door.

Instead she chose to threaten Rico with a gun, and discharged that gun in the direction of three people, two entirely innocent.

There are no excuses that permit that behavior, she was guilty, and foolishly turned down the minimum plea that could be offered.

Why do you continue to rely on statements Marissa made in the media instead of looking at the actual court documents.

Harmlessstalker
Harmlessstalker

@JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat MikadoCat please leave John alone.  He does not want to understand that Marissa had no reason for going back to that house, if any of that had happened to me, (even if I had to leave town) I Never would have laid eyes on him again...

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @JohnInIndyIn Marissa was so secure of her position that she thought this would blow over.  She didn't expect Rico to call 911 because it would surely mean that he would go to jail for violating the restraining order against him and even though she was angry with him she didn't want him to rot in prison.  Who would pay the bills if he got locked up?  She thought that maybe she had finally won his respect.  She didn't realize that she had fallen into his trap.  Besides, what part of Rico must stay at least 500' away from her residence or any residence she moves to do you not understand?  And so what if she stayed with her mother for a few weeks before delivering her baby?  That doesn't mean she "moved out".  I don't understand  why you want her to rot for 20 years so badly.

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat 

Marissa NEVER called police, it was Rico's house, Marissa hadn't lived there for over two months, she can't go in his house and announce he isn't allowed, nor did she make ANY objection when he arrived home, she intended to meet with him.

Are you sure Marissa didn't eat some twinkies and those are to blame?

Show me where in the law it allows for discharging a weapon while threatening a person based on ANY previous actions.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @JohnInIndyIn @OnewitnessUS @rustytrawler There are at least 7 reasons that the garage door could have failed temporarily.  We've been over this before.  Not one of those reasons were presented to the poor jury.

Just because it worked after Rico plugged it back in doesn't mean jack. 

Furthermore, what part of "no duty to retreat' do you not understand?

Have you even looked at the picture of the bullet hole in the wall?  It's at least 8' to the right of where his snarling face would have been.

You just had a lot of facts concealed from you and you've invested so much in trying to heap hatred upon Marissa that you can not let yourself believe that you are so wrong.  

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat @OnewitnessUS @rustytrawler 

It was Rico's home, Marissa was NOT living there.

Police check the garage door and it worked fine. All garage doors include an emergency cord to open them even if the opener is not working. What sort of garage door expert could have any credibility saying it could not be opened? It worked fine.

Marissa made lots of claims, but forensic showed the EXACT location of the bullet hole, not where she claimed.


JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @OnewitnessUS @rustytrawler 

Also the garage door was not working.  No expert was called to testify on her behalf in that regard.  The garage was just as much a part of the house as the kitchen or bedroom.  And when she discharged the weapon she was under attack.  She wasn't chasing him around shooting at him.  Instead she fired well over his snarling face while he was advancing toward her calling her names and threatening her in violation of a restraining order that required him to be 500' away from her.  And this all happened in her own home. 

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @OnewitnessUS @rustytrawler

This is the root of your disagreement.

OnewitnessUS knows the letter and the spirit of the law.  

MikadoCat knows how the law is applied in Florida by Angela Corey who was indicted by a citizens grand jury for concealing exculpatory evidence i.e. the photos of a bloodied George Zimmerman.

She needs a second indictment for concealing exculpatory evidence in the Marissa Alexander case.

MikadoCat
MikadoCat

@OnewitnessUS @MikadoCat @rustytrawler 

Marissa went into the garage with a working door, got her gun and went back into the kitchen to threaten Rico with it, and discharged the weapon.


How is it that you have been prosecuted and still don't understand the basics of the law?

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @rustytrawler neither of us was there and we do not have the full details no matter what the media dispels. most judges just go by the rule of law, not to say some are not ass holes or corrupt but we have to give this judge the benefit of the doubt since we really do not have evrythin in front of as he had.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@Openminded1 @JohnInIndyIn @rustytrawler He probably planned that too.  But she didn't have any intent to harm them and she didn't put them in the situation.

Look at the handwritten letter on scribd by one of Rico's previous victims.  She can probably even read it (unlike some witnesses). 

How could a judge or prosecutor in good conscience read that and proceed against her so zealously?  I'm seeing real cruelty and evil at work here. 

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@Openminded1 @JohnInIndyIn @rustytrawler They should have given her a plea like they gave Rico with a misdemeanor and a fine and time served.  Not a felony and loose the baby.  Rico should have still been in jail for beating up a pregnant lady half his size.  He got nothing for beating up a pregnant lady and she got nailed to the wall for standing up to him.  It hurts me to think about it.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @rustytrawler stop john you can not change the world, you can only be the best person you can. nothing more, life is to short. A GZ was a wannabe cop but it was TM who was the real problem in that case take it from a 30 year police veteran. In the alexander case which is so different she screwed up for sure which let the real dirt bag get over on her. The wrong here is the 20 year sentence, that is what is wrong with the justice system. Her max should have been 5 years with chance of parole in less then 3.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf No John a guy like that will never learn if he beats woman he is a coward and will always beat woman, children and animals. i know his type, he will not learn on till he gets his ass beat by a real man or shot by the next woman who wont miss. his days are numbered one way or another.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@Openminded1 @JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf I'm sure he knows his rights and the ins and outs and the worm holes and the loop holes.  He obviously has a Teflon coating or else he would have been in jail for beating up a pregnant lady instead of standing there in her face threatening to do it again.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf appeals take a long time and cost money plus few cases are ever over turned, that is the one area judges like to cover there butts, appeals make them look bad. With that said Marissa can move toward an appeal nothing to lose everything to gain.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf If they are court appointed they are paid much less from tax payer funds expenses etc. In the case of public defenders they are paid a salary from there jurisdiction in what ever state they are in. It is the case load they have and they tend to be lazy in most cases.

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf just remember if you are ever charged with a crime do everything you can not to use a public defender they are only a fast track to prison or jail. the best they can do in most cases is make a plea and that is only 50% of time. There case load is to high they just push paper they really do nothing else. 

Openminded1
Openminded1

@JohnInIndyIn @Openminded1 @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf He is a dirt bag john no question but he was smarter then her and she screwed up. His lawyer and I do not trust or like lawyers would not risk is law license for a dirt bag like him and he does not have enough money to excite his mouth peace.

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@Openminded1 @JohnInIndyIn @MikadoCat @NadjaAdolf 

She fell into his trap.  He had tried to frame at least two previous partners similarly.  Read their letters on scribd.com.  I'll also bet that he conspired with his lawyer to set her up.  Of course he already had a lawyer since he had a 6 page long criminal history of violence against women. 

JohnInIndyIn
JohnInIndyIn

@MikadoCat @Openminded1 @NadjaAdolf 

She fired well over his snarling face.  You should Google the photo.

If he had been concerned about his tween aged sons safety so much

he wouldn't have dragged them into a domestic dispute.  He would have stayed 500' away as required by the restraining order that was concealed from the jury.