Albuquerque Really Is Like Breaking Bad

The TV show has given me a way to explain my hometown without saying a word

  • Share
  • Read Later
AMC

Walter White (Bryan Cranston) and Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) in Breaking Bad

When I tell people that I am from Albuquerque, they usually tell me that’s where Breaking Bad is filmed.

Yes, I reply. Yes, it is.

Breaking Bad has given me a way to explain Albuquerque without saying a word. It’s a place where we struggle with drug epidemics, extreme drought, hunger, drunk driving, gun violence (New Mexico’s gun-death rate is 40% higher than the national average), and a corrupt police force. Nearly 20% of the population lives below the poverty line, and the crime rate is 53% higher than the national average. Albuquerque is a city plagued by mediocrity — a drying river, a losing football team (the University of New Mexico Lobos), a dearth of ambition. But it also gets under your skin and into your blood, like a drug you won’t forget and can’t explain. It will always be my home, even if I am far away.

(MORE: Breaking Bad Normalizes Meth, Argues Prosecutor)

At the core of Breaking Bad is family. It is what impels the show’s lead character, the cancer-stricken Walter White, to parlay his knowledge of chemistry into meth production. He wants to ensure the well-being of his wife and children after his death. No sin too great, no hell too deep. This faithfulness to family is the lifeblood of Albuquerque. Everything that lives in the desert has had to fight to stay alive, and survival requires banding together.

Everyone seems to know everyone here. Unlike California or the East Coast, with their large cities, New Mexico has only Albuquerque, population 552,000. It’s isolated. Reaching any city of similar size means at least four hours of highway driving. There are two independent natural food stores in the city, so if you regularly shop there, you’ll meet everybody in that demographic. Same goes for those who favor honky-tonks or feed stores.

Because this city is small, because it has an on-again, off-again relationship with the law — a legacy of its Wild West days, when New Mexico was the home of Billy the Kid — you encounter people from all walks of life who have made a lot of risky decisions. When I went away to college, I didn’t experience much new in the way of vice. Back home, sex, alcohol and weed began in middle school. By freshman year of high school, coke at parties was commonplace. When the club-music craze took over, the drugs Ecstasy and Molly were widespread. Off and on, people got into heroin. You didn’t have to go looking for this stuff. It just sort of showed up in front of you on a Wednesday morning, and you had to make the call, right then and there.

I often cited my status as a competitive runner as a reason to not partake in one drug or another. But the rebuttal was always, “What? You think you are that good? Look at Michael Phelps. He smokes weed, and you are never going to be that good, so why take yourself so seriously?”

(MORE: Is Heisenberg Dead? Walter White and the Light-Switch Theory of Morality)

That attitude — one embodied in the Breaking Bad character of Jesse Pinkman (Walter White’s troubled former student and business partner) and his malingering friends — is common. Who are you to think that you can really do something in this world? At the end of the day, all you have — and all you really need — are your friends and family and a little cash for some Bud Light, so why try to reach for anything else? In a place like Boston or Chicago, there is a tangible and prominent upper echelon to which to aspire. Not so in Albuquerque.

You can get away with a lot in this city. In high school, it was standard to go to a party, get wasted, have some quesadillas to “sober up,” and then rush home in a car to make curfew. Most people never got caught. We were smart kids, but we still did this sort of thing. Why? Because we could.

Without authorities to provide order, you’re left to rely on your internal sense of right and wrong. And when that sense goes awry, you can go to astonishing extremes that have a surprisingly long run, like Walter White, the teacher turned meth lord.

To be best known for your worst flaws is never ideal, but Albuquerque has embraced Breaking Bad as a redeemer. Businesses proudly display “Breaking Bad Filmed Here!” signs and offer tours to see the houses and labs used during filming. That’s how hungry we are for acknowledgement. Albuquerque is breaking. It always has been, and likely always will be. But that’s what I like about it. It makes everything whole — everything unbroken — seem more precious.

Madeleine Carey is a senior at Tufts University studying biology. She was raised in Albuquerque’s South Valley and wrote this for Zócalo Public Square. The views expressed are solely her own. 

MORE: A Conversation with Breaking Bad’s David Costabile

252 comments
dancingman87111
dancingman87111

I worked for UNM Hospitals Outpatient Clinics for two years. I was an Advanced Practice Provider and managed a panel of 1200 patients as well as all of the clinics walk-ins or same day visits and all of the new patients. The rates of drug addiction, drug abuse and drug diversion were phenomenal. I worked diligently to ensure safe and effective medical practice but the management at UNM Hospitals works to coerce and threaten Doctors and Advance Practice Providers who won't write prescriptions for narcotics, benzos and stimulants. I was threatened with termination for performing medical record checks (requiring voluntary records from person last treating), performing evaluations (physical exams, x/rays, MRIs), orthopedic consults, and any change/taper of medications. I came to the conclusion that the clinic manager at northeast heights(am), the advance practice supervisors (cd/kk) and the patient advocate (wb) were colluding to enable drug diversion, drug addiction and drug abuse. I long suspected there were financial motives behind the threats to practitioners who practice medicine safely and effectively as trained in medical school.

H.D.
H.D.

I grew up in Albuquerque, and moved to the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles over 33 years ago. Best move I've ever made, and the single best thing I've ever done for myself. Plus I've been Way more successful here than I ever would have if I'd stayed. I absolutely Love it here and have many, many wonderful, and inspiring friends... I don't miss Albuquerque a single bit, except for the friends I had growing up. Now it's just a place to visit, very briefly, and you'd better be very careful while you are there. When I have visited over the years, almost every time, I've witnessed some sort of violence, and was an unsuspecting victim once. Watch out for the night clubs. On visits, I Never go to them like I did growing up. Too many fights ensue. One thing I will admit that is positive, there are some great Mexican food restaurants. None the less, I sure as Hell would Never, Ever, move back to live ! No Way. They can have it...

TooZany
TooZany

This has to be one of the most ignorant views of ABQ I have ever heard.  This writer is using the Breaking Bad series and the stereotypes that come along with a television show, that mind you is FAKE and written by someone who knows nothing of the culture of our area, to try to find a way to get his shabby work printed  While it is true that ABQ struggles with it's share of problems which are common to most urban area in the US he fails to point out the beautiful side of our city.  ABQ has a vibrant culture, a progressive art & music scene, some of the best food on the planet, people who are beautiful inside and out,  an affordable cost of living, sunrises and sunsets that rival anywhere, majestic mountains, and for me personally some of the most loving & caring individuals I have met.  I am well traveled and can say that yes, our town can get reckless but mind you that the majority of the time it's for good reason.  I agree that people from ABQ aren't the type that will tolerate being pushed around & stepped on because we are a proud people.  The diversity of our culture is something unique to the area and most don't understand it and never will.  It is not a place where the weak survive. Just because the writer of this piece seems like he couldn't hack it doesn't mean that the rest of this nation should hear his jaded view of this oasis and believe it's anywhere near reality.  As for me I'm from ABQ and I love this place and frankly wouldn't want to call anyplace else my home.  To the people of ABQ and the whole state of New Mexico I salute you and have nothing but the deepest love and admiration for your perseverance.  If more people had your fortitude and strength this world would be better off.


Much Love,

Too Zany

Twitter : @TooZany

Jemorales
Jemorales

I'm not sure where this woman grew up, but it certainly wasn't the Albuquerque I grew up in!  At 33 years old, I have NEVER used or even tried a single drug.  In my public high school drugs where available, like I would expect in any American high school.  When offered a simple "no" was always sufficient.  No one ever asked me why I chose not to partake.  The picture she paints makes it sound as if anyone who comes here would be lucky to get by, much less survive.  I made it thought high school and I worked hard because that is what my parents expected of me.  I worked hard because I knew that was the only way I could ever afford to go to college.

Someone stated that the author when to a private school here in Albuquerque.  I'm honestly not surprised by that.  Most folks who can afford to attend private school live a much different life than the rest of the population.  It sounds to me like the expectations were different for her.  If I went out and got "wasted" frankly, my parents would have disowned me!

Like most cities Albuquerque has its problems, I won't deny it.  But I dare you to find a city that doesn't.  Albuquerque is a wonderful and unique place.  Born and raised here I have no intention of ever leaving.  I love the easy access to nature.  I love the amazing, friendly people.  My suggestion, ignore this horribly skewed interpretation of the city and stop by for a visit.  If you hate it, some people do, you never have to come back.  If you love it, like so many of us do, stay for a while.  Albuquerque welcomes you!

PKennedy
PKennedy

If this TV show is the epitome of what Albuquerque is supposed to be like - licensed high school teachers dealing Meth  - then that explains why people here seem to assume that if you're a licensed teacher (from ANOTHER STATE which DOES have standards like New York, Massachusetts or Connecticut) that you "must" be into all sorts of criminal dealings and must have a criminal record - I've lost count of all the times people ask if I have a criminal record AFTER I tell them I have a teaching license, as if they don't know that OTHER STATES check this before issuing the darn thing and if we did things like drugs or have sex with our underage students we'd lose our license to teach. I mean, fortunately for me, Gallup doesn't have the attitude of the rest of the state in these regards but still. I can't go to the state's largest city even to so much as shop without encountering this - unless I live my life in complete silence, never talking to or interacting with anyone in any way, shape or form while in Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Espanola, Las Vegas, Taos, Socorro, and of course the rest of the state. Or maybe I should rephrase that to just simply state "outside the Gallup metropolitan area." I'm glad Gallup has its own reputation and doesn't get dragged down into Albuquerque's.

DavettaLW
DavettaLW

So what it is important to note that the author left out, we do these things and survive and even thrive...going on to succeed as she has attending Tufts. At some point we break through and find the good. There are many in this city who've escaped the mundane.

Arbust91
Arbust91

I moved to Albuquerque, I live in a neighborhood of physicists and high  tech PhD's.

The public school in my neighborhood is every bit as good as the expensive private school

my daughter went to in another state. The kids in my neighborhood talk about where they

plan to go to grad school because college is a given. So yeah there are plenty of low income

areas in Albuquerque but its not all like that. What about the 20,000 plus highly educated workers at Sandia National Labs?

What about all the officers at Kirtland AFB ? You think their kids don't have hopes and aspirations?

bacaangelo
bacaangelo

Where do you get your statistics? You are lying, lying, lying! You're making Albuquerque look bad! Fake! For the record: All of those statements are false!  

DonP
DonP

Albuquerque, is in my opinion one of the most pleasant cities in America. To view it solely through the prism of a work of fiction that glorifies its most debased vices is a rather cruel act of stereotyping that will distort your view of any city. Albuquerque, on whole, has a remarkably rich culture that ebbs through its people, food, and aesthetics. It has an abundance of outdoor spaces and natural attractions that encourage a healthier lifestyle. It is a big city with a small town feel. I never watched Breaking Bad because I find its glorification of illicit drug culture unacceptable. The fact that a major news journal uses its perverse story line to stereotype a city is ... well ... in line with the rather poor quality of media that we get nowadays.

NishPatel
NishPatel

there isn't anything redeeming about new mexico besides the weather and the views. the mountains are nice. this city will never grow because "culture" narrows the possibilities here.

meh
meh

It might interest some people that she went to one of the private schools in ABQ. So, she might not have the most crystal clear view of what high school in ABQ is like.

Guy555
Guy555

SOUTH VALLEY, Albuquerque.That certainly explains it. Yeah, that is Breaking Bad territory. But that is South Valley, yo.

PeggyKeiper
PeggyKeiper

I lived in ABQ for three years through my Ph.D. coursework....as someone who is not from Albuquerque I think her depiction is pretty accurate in some respects - but way off in others. Albuquerque is a struggling city that is plagued by mediocrity, no doubt about it.  However, she is largely missing the rich culture that ABQ has to offer.  Having lived in 11 different states she is missing what ABQ does have to offer that is so unique - the culture!  The art, the history, the people....so many great things about ABQ that are not even touched on.  As always there are two sides to the story.   Lastly, to the people living there who don't see the 'roughness' of the culture.  Walk through Nob Hill or Downtown in the evening - with your eyes open, not closed. 


DanMcClellan
DanMcClellan

Extreme Drought! I agree! But the recent rain has been nice.

John_R_Scott
John_R_Scott

Hmm, I lived in the Burque during high-school, which if the author is correct with her description of the 505, I should have barely survived. This is a very bleak picture to paint of a very cool city, but the worst part is the fact that this can be the description of almost any city with any size. Hell, Being from Southern California, Having lived in Dallas TX, Phoenix, AZ and other places, I find Albuquerque to be tame in comparison (BY FAR). This piece strikes me as something written by a person who is trying to capitalize on the "cool" factor that breaking bad has brought to the city in the hopes of impressing readers, friends, or anyone willing to give it a try. There were drugs at parties, sex and even some arrests in high school, but then again, there was a heroin bust at my nephews prestigious school in Dallas, so I again am missing the shock & awe the writer is trying to extract. Anywho, I will be back in the state for the Balloon fiesta, where my biggest problem will be to decide on Red, green or both.

SaintRico
SaintRico

Wow...hundreds of great articles out there about Albuquerque, written by Albuquerqueans (Burquenos!) and Time picks this vapid piece for their site? Lame.

dlvoz
dlvoz

Wow. Exaggerate much? Please. Next time make sure that you check your facts, because you just made our hometown seem pretty horrific.

ronfaich
ronfaich

Let's all agree with the 20-something year old, while she still knows everything!

RubyGrzelachowski
RubyGrzelachowski

I have lived in Albuquerque since 1985 raised my daughter here and I have never seen the type of life that this girl is portraying. With that being said Albuquerque much like any other large city has its share of crime and violence. Now this girl who wrote this article must of seen a lot as she was raised in the South Valley an area of town I stay clear from as that is the Ghetto so to speak! To me Albuquerque is amazing and I am glad to live here!  Breaking Bad could have filmed in any part of the country and would have had the same outcome. I'm glad that it was filmed here. Just so you all no it was a Fictional
Series!

KevinNelson
KevinNelson

I wish she wouldn't tell people she is from here (Albuquerque) I really dont want people to think this is the type of person that Our wonderful city has produced! If you really want to know about Albuquerque come visit. Personally I love this place & it does have its problems but so does everywhare you go, Please dont let the paid opinion of one motavated writer discourage you from visiting our great city! 

MrsJones
MrsJones

Way off. I don't know what nasty middle school you went to, but I never once encountered any drugs at the two that I attended (John Adams and Madison). Do you feel better now that you totally trashed a city you clearly know nothing about?

AnthonyRayLovato
AnthonyRayLovato

She has no clue! I doubt she grew up in Albuquerque  because there is hardly any truth in her piece.  What's even more astonishing is that her piece of crap work is getting all this attention. There seems to be some jealousy about Albuquerque and New Mexico being in the film industry. It could be because Albuquerque and New Mexico have a beauty that is not easily matched. 


Every once in a while there will be a story that puts down Albuquerque and/or New Mexico that gets national attention. The media runs with it, it's too bad. 

Apparently she feels the need to build herself up by putting others down.  Small minds and the uniformed show their ignorance. 

ShonaFerguson
ShonaFerguson

WOW TIME...do you feel better about yourself making Albuquerque sound so Horrific! Dig around in your own back yard I bet you find the same stuff.  ATTN. TIME READERS: Albuquerque, NM is like any city...yes there is some drugs and some crime but for the most part this is a FUN culturally rich society of people who will wave smile and help you find where you are headed, like every place there are some low life people. We welcome your visit and hope you will disregard this article making our city sound like a cesspool. SHAME ON YOU TIME MAG. we are a very struggling poor state and we need people to visit here and we welcome them with kindness and open arms! 

JerryRod
JerryRod

The problem with Burque is apathy, resentment and fear. Take for example the death scene of a civil rights lawyer that has remained in the local and national media for almost 3 years now. The scene was trashed by our police department and the state attorney general called them out on it. No response from the citizens of Burque. The petition is here: http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/justice-for-mary-han-1

If we don't learn from the past, we will keep repeating it. The corruption in this city has to be stopped and the only ones with the power to do that are its citizens. Can it be that we care more about a fictional character than a person?

saygen
saygen

Madeline, The next time you're in Albuquerque, come hang out with me and I can show you that we are much more than the vices you remember... ouch!

MN
MN

I grew up in ABQ too - lived there a lot longer than 10 years - and lived in other parts of the sate as well. I also agree that the author touches on many truths about the city (though don't wholly agree with all of them) and that people who think she is trashing our city are missing the point. Like the characters in Breaking Bad, Albuquerque is complicated and so is our relationship with it.  Those of us who grew up there - whether we've stayed or gone on to do other things - understand that complexity and (I think) are generally OK with it.  Whether that is good or bad, I don't know...

kvsa999
kvsa999

This is a ridiculous portrayal of our city. Clearly you are one of the low achievers who only cares about things like "loosing football team"- I've lived in Albuquerque for 10 years and no one has ever offered me, much less pressured me, to take drugs. (Although I've faced that issue in LA and Denver.)  It is a place with a vibrant cultural and arts scene.  What other American city its size could boast the number of dance studios Albuquerque has or our high number of public murals?  If you visit the data from the last census you will see we are one of the most well-integrated, ethnically diverse cities in America.  We have hiking, hot air ballooning, good restaurants, an amazing Argentine Tango Festival, and we are the FLAMENCO CAPITAL OF THE USA!  Not to mention a thriving independent business community.  

JoshRoper
JoshRoper

''That’s how hungry we are for acknowledgement'' You seem to think Albuquerque is concerned with what the world thinks of it. Albuquerque celebrated it's tricentennial 7 years ago, it doesn't need a ''redeemer''.

BennyMamamelo
BennyMamamelo

 Albuquerque is not at ALL like this person writes about. It has it flaws as any city has. And New Mexico isn't just Albuquerque. Sounds like it was bad parenting for Ms. Carey.

KilianRempRemp
KilianRempRemp

I'm not sure where all of the heat is coming from towards this article. Reading through it, I couldn't help but agree with so many of the things she wrote. Regarding the drug problem, I've never been anywhere else where there are multiple billboards advertising to teens against meth, and until leaving the state thought drugs in high school were normal (obviously, not everybody does them. But they are present). Kids in high school drove drunk all the time, it's true. This didn't seem like an effort to bash on Albuquerque as a city, it's just laying down some facts. I grew up there, love the place, and have to objectively say there are a lot of problems with it - and I think this is the same for the writer. The article wasn't saying "Abq is a bad place." The values we learned there are different than a lot of other cities, and the environment surrounding you is different than much of America: "At the end of the day, all you have — and all you really need — are your friends and family and a little cash for some Bud Light." This isn't a bad thing, but you just won't find the "get your career together and get ahead NOW" attitude that I've found in California in NM. The article does a great job comparing the truths of Albuquerque to some things the show shows, which a lot of viewers from other states may not know.

Everyone freaking out saying this article is bashing Albuquerque need to calm down, eat a bowl of chile, look at the Sandias and realize they don't need an article to remind them of all the good things about living where they do. (I'm looking at you, @Albuquerque )

highdesertlady
highdesertlady

I think this girl is catching a lot of flack for stating clearly what is wrong with Albuquerque. Yes, all cities have problems. No, not all cities have the magnitude of problems that Albuquerque does.I'm not willing to subscribe to the idea that there is always someplace worse, so that must mean we are great.

This place can be great, but blind denial of our problems will not improve anything. If you really are ok with the state of education, violence, drug use, etc... in this city, then you're one of the members of the culture of mediocrity.

Breaking bad is a great show and I am thankful that our city benefited from it. I recently was on the east coast for a month for work, and many people associated Albuquerque with Breaking Bad. It didn't upset me. It gave me the opportunity to tell people about our awesome city.

Brett_S
Brett_S

If you hate your city so much, the easiest thing you can do is run away, right? Your sour taste of Albuquerque is yours to claim, but don't act like your reality of the "upper echelons" of other cities is reason to hate on the only experience you seen to had growing up in. I'm a native to Chicago (the city, not the suburbs) and in a long term relationship with someone who is originally from Albuquerque; to put it politely, he has a much different interpretation than you. My impression of the town was to look at the beauty it has to offer, rather than looking at its issues that it has to deal with, the only lens you seem to have from this article. When I think of Chicago, I think of my hometown's issues too. We are one of the most segregated cities in the United States. We have a high rate of violence, most of which has been sociologically linked to the wide gap of poverty. We have been historically linked as one of the biggest government policy enactors of gentrification. There are a variety of problems in every city. The question I always ask in my position in working with students is; to simplify it: "what are you going to do about it"? I wish I knew your answer to this question, because you don't seem to answer it, and from what it sounds like, you've run away from your problems. A variety of community organizations exist to solve some of our problems in Chicago, and I'm sure many exist as well in Albuquerque. If you were looking for an audience to promote your poor taste in your former city, congratulations. If you were looking for a way to highlight the city's problems in order to enact change to better the environment you no longer live, you failed.

HMU
HMU

Everyone is happy to love on Breaking Bad when it is convenient. If it’s making money for you, or putting Albuquerque on the map in the New York Times, you can’t get enough. The second someone tries to point out the realities reflected within the show, it becomes a personal attack. Never mind the author’s true points here which most of you seemed to have missed, “But it also gets under your skin and into your blood, like a drug you won’t forget and can’t explain. It will always be my home, even if I am far away.” She writes of how New Mexico becomes a home, a home where we should take a deeper look at these issues being brought up in order to continuously improve ourselves. 

I grew up here too, but left for many reasons. I needed to explore, learn and see other parts of the United States and the world beyond. I go to school 1500 miles away and as I approach graduation, people routinely ask if I will be returning to Albuquerque. My answer? As much as I would love to, I cannot – there is not enough opportunity. Not a single school in New Mexico offers my chosen degree for graduate school. Forbes named New Mexico the worst state for investors, a so-called “death spiral state”. I make no apologies for wanting more. Is Albuquerque wonderful in many aspects? Yes. Does the economy leave much to desire? Absolutely. Is the quality of life of its citizens near the bottom of the country? Unfortunately.

What about the author’s paragraph in the middle that most of y’all seemed to have missed? “At the core of Breaking Bad is family…This faithfulness to family is the lifeblood of Albuquerque. Everything that lives in the desert has had to fight to stay alive, and survival requires banding together.” Seems to me that speaks to much of what y’all have to say. She is encouraging these relationships as a means for survival, a way of combating the horrors that are plaguing our city. 

Can you find these problems in any major city? Absolutely, but that is not the author’s point. The show is not set in Chicago or Detroit. Is it set here, and if you have such issue with what has been shown, then perhaps your outrage should have been channeled five seasons ago when the show premiered.

Her closing point seems to have been lost – that Albuquerque “has embraced Breaking Bad as a redeemer.” It gives us something to be proud of, something other than the drugs, poverty and crime. We want more and that is a good thing. Change is starting with the very first question she poses, when people acknowledge Albuquerque as the setting of Breaking Bad. Before the series, when I told people where I was from, I was greeted with a blank stare all too often, or one of the ignorant questions we have all heard (“Do you live in the United States?”). Now, people recognize the name, the city and the place.

I’m glad you have all taken the time to speak up about the things you love about the city. Now take that energy and do something with it. Help create change where it needs to be within the city. Make it better. That pride you just demonstrated in your comments? Prove it. Back up your words with actions and make a difference in your community. Maybe in ten years a television series about a wonderful idyllic place to live will be set here.

BrandonCory
BrandonCory

I lived there for a while, the city itself was really an effigy of the state to be honest... the good spots and the bad all intertwined to make a maddening place to live. But it did like it in a strange way.. believe me when I say there are far worse places to live in New Mexico than Albuquerque.

brucethedruid
brucethedruid

@H.D. This is too funny...I have a friend who grew up in Sun Valley. He mentions all the gang bangers, drugs and crime he was exposed to. He tells the story of being at a gas station and living through a driveby shooting. So I think its pretty funny that you paint San Fer as some kind of Oasis in SoCal. The Valley has quite the rep in Southern California: The valley girls on the one side, the latino gangbangers on the other....

Tere
Tere

@Arbust91 you obviously don't represent the norm. also you moved there, you weren't born there. you didn't grow up there. Your ancestors didn't spill their blood on this land when it was invaded by Spaniards and then by US troops from Texas so you obviously aren't going to be affected by the dark depressing history that has haunted the hispanic and indian communities. I'm tire of people from out of state coming and thinking they know anything about what its like to actually be from Albuquerque.  The officers at Kirkland are not from Albuquerque, and the people from the Sandia National Labs are not from Albuquerque.They came to Albuquerque bringing their blissful ignorance with them. 

Mover
Mover

@Arbust91 In case you overlooked it, the departure rate from the state far exceeded the incoming rate last year. This further confirms the legitimate fear factor that is prevalent around town. If you have not been the victim of a crime or auto accident, then unfortunately the odds are you will be.

It makes no difference what neighborhood you may be living in at the moment, the crime occurs in all parts of town. Granted, the south sides of town are the worst, but it happens everywhere around here, and it is just getting worse by the day. 

I relocated here because I am retired from the Army and it was dubbed a military friendly state, but what I was not told involves the rampant crime, aggressive drivers that regularly appear to be competing in a texting contest, and a handful of cops that have an arrogant mindset. I plan to join the caravan of departures in the near future and take my doctoral training with me.

PKennedy
PKennedy

@Arbust91 You're lucky. MOST of Albuquerque is uneducated, low-class trash, apparently. Even right next to UNM. If there are parts of Albuquerque a single female can live in and not be around all these drugs, alcohol, and crime, then I have yet to find it and I've tried now on three different occasions over the past three years. I give up. Gallup is where Teach For America sends teachers FOR A REASON. Math teachers who come from other areas to teach in APS have gotten multiple death threats from their students - and APS sides with the students and fires the teacher. I kid you not. That teacher is now working at UNM in the bookstore. What a waste of so-called "needed" Math teachers.

Sara456
Sara456

@KevinNelson fyi she originally wrote her article for Zocalo Public Square, which Time later picked up on. Time did nothing to influence her opinion of where she grew up and the experiences that she encountered 


ShonaFerguson
ShonaFerguson

@kvsa999 WORD! I agree this article made me heated...we need tourism and TIME sux for making us look so horrific. Thanks for your response.

ShonaFerguson
ShonaFerguson

BUD LIGHT???? We have one of the strongest tight knit NA programs of any anywhere! so I never think of my city and bud light!!!! i think of the Manzanos, Sandia Crest covered in Snow, the tram, all the gyms and healthy living support from local farmers and our awesome Co-Op grocery stores, coffee shops, local art, jewelry, and Big Balloons!!!! Also, Fry Bread and festive music randomly spread across town, our token nude guy on central....come on BEER??? Meth???? they obviously did not know who to hang around...it is sad.

ShonaFerguson
ShonaFerguson

@KilianRempRemp @Albuquerque Go into the slums in Denver, Colorado and hang out for 24 hours; you will be lucky to make it out alive. Colorado has more billboards over drugs and meth than I have ever seen in my whole life. Graphic too. One, is a little girl about 14 on the floor of a public bathroom with her underpants down but dress covering her lap and she is leaning on a toilet all messed up looking, disheveled hair and it says "I bet you never thought your little girl would loose her virginity this way" zero tolerance Colorado against Meth! My 10 year old daughter saw that and asked me what virginity was????? SO you are mistaken and might think about traveling a little more before having this open opinion. I have lived and traveled to 17 different states and I am HERE in Albuquerque safe and very happy!  

ShonaFerguson
ShonaFerguson

@HMU i get where you are coming from but I don't totally agree with you. Thanks and I respect your opinion...I too moved away when I was young to experience life and the world but I am back and always come back because I love it. I am fully involved in the community and volunteer and give back daily. I sit on the Board of Directors of a Wellness Center and much more!!!!