By 2035, We’ll All Be Eating Grasshopper Tacos

And other expert predictions about the future of everything

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FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / Getty Images

“Unless somebody calls you crazy,” said inome CEO Naveen Jain, “you’re not dreaming big enough.”

Such was the spirit of Next: Tomorrow, Today, Thursday’s marquee Chicago Ideas Week event during which experts in food, tech, energy and more all predicted the future of their industries. Here’s the best of what they shared.

In the future …

1. We’ll be harvesting resources from the moon.
One way to deal with the growing scarcity of rare-earth elements (which are used in countless autos and electronics): get them on the moon. Indeed, in recent years, scientists have posited that lunar mining could yield all kinds of valuable resources — including Helium-3, which helps with cold fusion — and now Jain is trying to make that a reality. His company Moon Express aims to send robotic scavengers to the moon.

2. Our phones will charge in 30 seconds.
“Envision a world beyond batteries,” said Eesha Khare, the Harvard freshman who developed a “super-capacitor” that’s small enough to fit in a cell-phone battery and powerful enough to charge it in 20 to 30 seconds. Although the tech is nascent — during a demo at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, where she won $50,000, Khare used it to power an LED light — the potential is massive.

3. We’ll eat insects — happily.
High-protein, nutrient-rich, low-carb, low fat — were insects not, well, insects, they’d be a dieter’s dream. But within 20 years, said Josh Schonwald, author of The Taste of Tomorrow: Dispatches From the Future of Food, that perception of grossness — dominant in America — will start to change: “Edible insects are coming.” Already, there are grasshopper tacos in D.C., cicada sushi rolls in Connecticut, and toffee mealworms in San Francisco. And the Clinton Global Initiative just doled out $1 million to a group of students for an insect-farming project. Yum?

3 comments
rpearlston
rpearlston

Hardly.  There are plenty or people who will not eat all types of insects, and also plenty of people who will remain vegetarian or vegan.  The latter two choices are actually the best ones, when it comes to our growing incapacity to provide enough food for all.  After all, it takes an obscene number of pounds of grain to produce one pound of poultry or mammalian muscle that many humans like to eat.  This is despite the fact that by the time humans do consume the muscles of dead animals, that flesh is already beginning to rot.  That same amount of grain can feed far more people than can a pound of rotting animal flesh.